Goring Village Trail


 


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/houses.htm

1. Beach House, Sea Lane
With a date plaque saying ‘1887 Jubilee’ this is the earliest house that still survives in Sea Lane, Goring. The cottages that stood on the east side of the road near the Mulberry have long since been pulled down in the name of progress. The tree that blooms every Easter is a Judas Tree.
Beach House is now a doctors surgery, but is being developed soon into seven flats. We are promised that the character of the house will be maintained. Picture

2. Shaftesbury Avenue / Robson Road
Two small groups of houses at the junction of Shaftesbury Avenue, Goring Road, and at Robson Road. They are both designated as conservation areas.
The style is called International Modern. It was popular about 1928, originated at the Bauhaus school in Germany, and taken up in other countries, not least by Le Corbusier in France. Picture


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/courtlands.htm

3. Courtlands


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/churches.htm

4. St Mary’s Church


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/history.htm

5. English Martyrs Roman Catholic Church
English Martyrs Roman Catholic Church is built next to the attractive and historic Jupps Barn which is now the church hall. But the highlight is the modern church with ceiling paintings inspired by Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel in Rome reproduced by artist Gary Bevans over five years. If you have seen the original, or especially if you have never done so, a visit here is a must. Picture

A complete set of superb photos of the ceiling is at:

http://www.dabnet.org/goring.htm

6. Field Place
Built in 1400 or earlier, is just outside the parish in Tarring was the principal manor House in Goring. It is now owned by Worthing Council and is a sports and social centre. Picture

7. Smugglers Farm, Moat Way
Tucked away between Moat Way and Smugglers Walk, the farm was part of the original Sea Place Manor dated 1321. The name Smugglers Farm is modern. The water implied by the name Moat Way is still very evident and some modern houses have foundations 12 feet deep. In fact however, Moat Way is named after Mr Claude Moat, and nothing to with the pond.
Picture

8. Tudor Cottage, 201 Goring Road
The oldest dwelling place in Goring. As you would expect it has a history of smuggling. The building has been an antique shop and a sweet shop, but is now a private house. Picture

9. Richard Jeffries
Sea View, Jefferies Lane, just near the Mulberry pub, was built in 1880. Richard Jeffries lived there for a couple of years until his death 1887 at the age of 39. Picture
A plaque on the house commemorates him as a naturalist and prose poet of the countryside. Of the Sussex Downs he wrote:

There is the sea below to bathe in,
the air of sky up hither to breathe, the sun to infuse
the invisible magnetism of his beams.
These are the three potent medicines of Nature,
and they are the medicines that by degrees
strengthen not only the body but the unquiet mind.

There is a Richard Jefferies Society.
Website: http://www.treitel.org/Richard/jefferies.html
And there is more on him: http://www.bath.ac.uk/~lissmc/rjeffs.htm
Books by Richard Jefferies: http://www.treitel.org/Richard/rj_list.html

10. Malthouse Cottages
Just at the end of Jefferies Lane, probably the only row of original cottages left from the the old Goring, the rest having been bulldozed by the developers, some say with the active encouragement of Worthing Council. These are lovely, but probably not very convenient to live in. There is a very attractive communal garden along the front.
Picture

11. The Bull Inn, Goring Street
Goring Street was at one time the only road in Goring, leading down to Goring Hall. It now very much a residential area. The Inn is probably 16th Century with some of the walls over one metre thick. It has been modernised and is often up for planning permission to modernise it more. Picture

12. Court House, Sea Lane
Some of Court House, now the only bed-and-breakfast accomodation in Goring, is certainly old. But there is no evidence it was actually used as a court of law, and there are certainly no dungeons. More likely it was named after one of the owners, Williams de la Court. There was at that time a Court Farm which has now been built over.
Picture


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/gap.htm

13. Goring Gap
– flints found here


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/goringcastle.htm

14. Castle Goring


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/goringhall.htm

15. Goring Hall


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/highdown.htm

16. Highdown, and the Chalk Garden


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/baloos/history.htm

17. Baloos


http://www.goring-by-sea.uk.com/ilex.htm

18. Ilex Avenue

 

 

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